Sunday, June 25, 2017
Tags Posts tagged with "iso 9000"

iso 9000

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    Quality

    Have you ever stood staring at a range of products in a supermarket trying to make up your mind which one to buy?  They all look quite similar, but one stands out and you buy it.  Why?  It’s got a sign on the shelf and a logo on the product to tell you that it’s won an award for quality.

    So you’ve just based your purchase on Quality – Your customers are making the same decision every day!

    Quality is more than just finished product, it’s the processes, systems and people that are behind the product.   Quality is everybody’s responsibility.

    Quality is the pursuit of excellence, striving to be the best we can and getting ahead of our competitors.  It is meeting the needs and expectations of all stakeholders – our customers, our suppliers, our staff and the community at large.

    How can we ensure that we are exploiting all avenues to be the very best?  A recognized standard such as ISO 9001 certification promotes the use of quality tools in business.   The ASQ (American society for quality) estimates that for every €1 spent on a quality management system, such as ISO 9001, returns €6 in revenue, €16 in cost reduction and €3 in profit – that’s €25 for every €1 spent!

    93% of organisations agree that the implementation of a quality management system such as ISO9001 was a significant driver of success and most would agree that without it they could not justify their pricing to customers.

    If you are looking at ways to improve your ROI by improving your quality then consider ISO certification.   Using an expert to help you implement a quality management system will ensure ISO 9001:2015 accreditation which will in turn help you make significant improvements and lead to significant growth.

     

    This post has been a guest posting from Joann O’Brian over at our friends at CG Business Consulting Ireland .

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      ISO Implementation Process

      Preparing for an ISO implementation process of any ISO standard can be overwhelming and frightening for many. How an organization prepares for implementation will depend on factors such as size and complexity of its processes, the current knowledge and culture related to the standard (quality, environmental, safety, etc), the maturity of any other existing systems related to the standard wishing to implement, and many others. Despite the differences there may be between organizations, there are a few tips that will facilitate the implementation process of any management system, these are:

      Know the standard.

      It is essential that some personnel knows the management system’s requirements. Everyone does not need to be an expert on the requirements of the specific standard that will be implemented, but key workers need to fully know and understand all of the requirements of the standard.

      Inform everyone what is going on.

      The implementation process is not a task of just a few chosen ones. Everyone needs to be involved in this process. Every worker needs to know what is being implemented, why is it being implemented, which are the benefits for the organization and for themselves, and how they will be involved in the process. When people are informed, they will be more open and willing to collaborate in the implementation.

      Analyze the organization’s current situation.

      Before starting to implement any ISO management system, an organization needs to know its level of compliance with the standard. This will allow the organization to understand beforehand its strengths and weaknesses regarding the ISO management system wishing to implement and estimate the time needed for implementation.

      Map your processes.

      Establish and record current processes in order to know the relationships between departments and how the processes flow within the organization. This will allow organizations to plan their implementation by processes and not just by areas and departments.

      Review existing procedures and work instructions.

      Many processes need written and documented information that will guarantee that activities are carried out in the correct manner. Organizations need to review which processes are documented and how many work instructions there are. It is not the same to develop a few documents and just review work instructions than to develop them from scratch. Organizations need to have an idea of how much time they will have to invest in developing and reviewing documents.

      Review current training programs.

      Evaluate existing training and awareness programs. Training and awareness are an important part in the implementation process and if an organization has not considered training its workers, it would be best to redefine these programs to make sure that a large percentage of workers are trained and informed about policies, procedures, regulations, etc that will be a part of their daily activities.

      These are some recommendations that will help organizations prepare for the implementation process of any ISO management system. The most important aspect to keep in mind is to make sure that the whole organization is working for the same objectives and pulling in the same direction.

       

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        1. Commit to improvement.

        For any QMS to improve, it is essential that everyone is committed to seeking problems, evaluating efficiency and effectiveness of processes and implementing better and improved ideas. Management should be the first to make this commitment and if management “walks the talk” then everyone will follow.

        1. Analyse and assess current QMS.

        Organizations need to take a closer look at their current practices in order to identify any gaps between what is being done and what should be done. This can be achieved by interviewing workers in critical control points, reviewing procedures and records and observing how processes are occurring. Any steps that are not adding value to the process, the system or the organization must be identified, removed or improved.

        1. Include everyone in training programs.

        A QMS is not the responsibility of one person or one department. Everyone must be involved in improving the quality of products, services and processes.

        Organizations should establish a training program for new employees and existing ones.  These programs should promote knowledge, produce skills and capacities and reduce resistance when implementing new ideas for improvement.

        1. Define clear goals and objectives and make sure everyone knows them.

        QMS should aim at achieving specific goals. If a clear path is not drawn, there’s a risk that people will be working real hard but in different directions. Time should be spent in assuring everyone knows these goals, how they’ll be achieved, how they’re measured and periodically they should be informed of where the organization is standing in relation to these goals.

        1. Make sure the right key performance indicators (KPI) are being used.

        Organizations need to carefully select and review their KPI. These should let an organization know how efficient and effective processes are and indicate where possible problems could be. If they are not giving a real overall picture of where the organization is at regarding quality, then another look should be taken to change or improve what and how performance is being measured.

        1. Listen to the suggestions of employees and customers.

        Create a system that will promote workers and customers to share improvement ideas. Many great improvement ideas come directly from the people processing a product or the people that actually use it.

        1. Give people credit.

        To encourage participation throughout the organization, motivate workers by recognizing their work and their ideas. Compensation or recognition should not necessarily be monetary, a simple public recognition in working meetings to can have great effects in lifting workers morale.

        1. Make the system simple.

        A QMS that is extremely complex and overloaded with documents is not necessarily the best one. If documents and procedures are long and complicated, it is very likely that people will never use them. Evaluate the system and make sure that it makes sense and that it’s as simple as possible.

        1. Create quality groups.

        In many organizations workers from different departments or areas are reluctant with sharing information. By bringing together people from different areas to evaluate processes and recommend improvements, an open and more effective communication can be achieved between areas that operationally seem to be apart.

        1. Have a quality attitude.

        In order to reach the goals that have been set, organizations need to identify and detect problems and weaknesses but they must focus on improvements. If managers are constantly focusing on failures and defects and not on how to remove or improve them, the right attitude and mindset for quality will never be achieved.

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          The ISO 9000 series of quality standards is the most used management system worldwide; thousands of organizations rely on these standards to establish an effective quality management system. Here are some facts every organization pursuing to implement ISO 9001 should know.

          1. The ISO 9000 family of standards are a set of standards and guidelines that have global reputation as being the basis for the establishment of quality management systems (QMS).
          2. The adoption of all standards published by ISO, including standards in the ISO 9000 family, is voluntary in nature.
          3. In the ISO 9000 series, all standards can be implemented without certification. Any business can use the models from the standards to improve quality management systems.
          4. Many countries have adopted the ISO 9000 family of standards and have also appropriated its numbering system for their national standards. For instance in the United Kingdom, ISO 9001 is referred to as BS EN ISO 9001:2008, with BS standing for British Standard and EN for European Norm. In Sri Lanka, the standard is numbered SLS ISO 9001:2008, with SLS denoting Sri Lankan Standard.
          5. Any organization, regardless of the type of products or services they offer, can use ISO 9001 as their guideline to implement, maintain and improve a successful QMS.
          6. ISO 9001 provides a process approach for its execution, which enables the QMS to connect with other organizational processes; and its focus on continuous improvement and customer satisfaction will lead to an improved business performance.
          7. ISO 9001 specifies what an organization “should” do, but not “how” they should do it, giving great flexibility for any company, large or small, to use this standard. Additionally, ISO 9001 does not establish specific quality requirements; this is a decision taken by each organization; the standard is only a guide to achieve the goals and objectives set by each organization.
          8. Specific industry requirements were added to ISO 9001 to create standards for organizations in the automotive, telecommunications, aerospace, medical devices, oil and gas, and information technology sectors. These QMS standards have not diluted or modified the requirements of the ISO 9001 generic standard, but have added some sector-specific requirements, guidelines and clarifications. Some of these are:
            • Automotive industry:  ISO/TS 16949
            • Medical devices: ISO 13485
            • Primary packaging materials for medicinal products: ISO 15378
            • Petroleum, petrochemical and natural gas industries: ISO/TS 29001
            • Telecommunications industry: TL 9000
            • Aerospace Industry: AS 9100; AS9110 and AS9120
          9. Certification of your QMS by an accredited certification body generates confidence among your existing and potential customers and other interested parties that you are capable of supplying consistently conforming products or services.
          10. Adherence to the ISO standards can be publicized to gain market access abroad, because many foreign buyers place a premium on these standards.

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            Ready to implement ISO 9001 in your organization? Here are some ISO 9001 tips that will help make the process easier.

            Implement ISO 9001 for the right reason.

            When implementing a quality management system (QMS) for ISO 9001, management should be clear about the purpose of the QMS. If the only driver is to get on customers’ tender lists or because a competitor has already got one, it’s highly likely that the QMS will remain a set of documents for certification purposes only. Rather, management should aim for a QMS that will help the organization produce quality products or services, continuously improve its process, and provide confidence to customers that the organization is capable of meeting their requirements all the time.

            Motivate your workforce.

            In order for organizations to achieve a desired level of quality, people need to get involved. People are the essence of organizations and their full involvement is essential to implement and maintain ISO 9001. Employees can be motivated by:

            • Ensuring that everyone knows and understands the organization’s quality policy;
            • Defining and communicating responsibilities and authorities within the organization;
            • Building the competence of employees;
            • Providing adequate infrastructure and work environment;
            • Initiating improvements, e.g. by implementing employees’ suggestions.

            Hire a consultant if…

            If an organization’s staff does not have the time or skills to develop the QMS by themselves, a good consultant will make possible a speedy transfer of knowledge and skills. If the staff does have the time, there are enough published materials available from the web that will help staff obtain the necessary skills to develop the QMS.

            Take the necessary time to implement your QMS.

            All too often organizations are in a hurry to obtain certification and do not spend the time needed to implement the system effectively. Before applying for certification, your QMS needs to be in place for at least three months and its effectiveness checked through an internal audit, followed by corrective actions on audit findings.

            Define SMART objectives.

            Many organizations set quality objectives that are impossible to meet. Objectives need to be specific and relevant to the process or task to which they are being applied. They also need to be measurable and achievable within the resources that can be made available in a realistic and timely manner. It’s helpful to have a start and completion date.

            Go easy with the paperwork.

            Many believe that everything in the system needs to be elaborately documented. ISO 9001 only requires one quality manual, six procedures, and approximately 20 records. Many organizations are better off sticking to what is required and keeping those documents simple; additional procedures and records should be considered only if they add value to the system.

            Set the example.

            Some employees, especially mid-level managers, may find it difficult to change their ways of doing things and some can have a tendency to deviate from defined procedures. To change this, top management should ‘walk the talk’, i.e. they should not allow deviations from set procedures or permit the release of materials with deviations. Under such an approach, the mid-level managers will start respecting system requirements and everyone will take account of their responsibilities for the success of the QMS.